When it comes to writing a Facebook ad the simpler the better, but you need some great copy in those few lines to make an impact.

So how do you do that?

Social Media Optin

I’ve gathered some great advise from Bryan Cohen about writing Facebook ads.

Though he normally writes for authors, this advice is so good it transcends industries.
So. Take out your pen and paper and take notes because this could be a game changer to getting the right kind of traffic to your site.

The Hook:

When writing the hook you need to keep two ideas in mind:
1. Length

2. Mood
The length of your hook needs to be one line, or 1-3 short sentences (12-14 words). Those three lines need to build up the emotion of your ad which leads us to the second idea. To create the right mood that gets your ad clicked on, you need to know what gets your prospective buyer excited. If it’s a problem – poke at it. If it’s a yearning – paint the picture for them.

Here’s an example of my own Facebook ad for my book currently being featured on Kickstarter.
Ex) A painfully detailed guide. A new approach to web copy and content. Finally, the solution.

The Selling Paragraph

Really this needs to be about ½ a paragraph. Remember, the most important part of a Facebook ad is keeping it short. If a scanning reader thinks it’ll be too much work to read, they’ll scroll right past it.

Your selling paragraph needs to have three elements to be complete.
1. The “if you like” comparison to give your prospective buyer a frame of reference to what your product/service/book is about.

2. Three strong adjectives that paint the picture of what you’re offering in the mind of your buyer. This can describe the product, or the result of the product.

3. And finally, you need to end the selling paragraph with the “then you’ll love (your product/service/book)” line. This affirms the worth of your offering to the prospective buyer and unconsciously reassures them that this is what they’ve been looking for to assuage their problem, or fulfill their yearning.

Here’s the selling paragraph example from my own product.
Ex) if you enjoy compulsively detailed guides and templates that leave no room for error or confusion, then you’ll love COPYWRITING FOR CREATIVES. A free guide to web copy and content.

Call to action

And finally, you need the call to action. Simply put, this means you need to tell your prospective buyer what to do next. It’s all well and good to craft a beautiful ad, and (though it may be painfully obvious what should be done next) people are bombarded with ads all the time.

To make the difference you need to provide a clear direction for the person reading your ad.

Do you want them to:

1. Sign up for your newsletter

2. Buy your product

3. Contact you about your services

4. Attend your webinar

5. Come to your event

Tell them what to do and make it simple. One quick direction can go a long way. Here are some examples I’ve used.
Ex) Tap the link to SIGN UP and get your free copy now
Ex) Tap the link to buy COPYWRITING FOR CREATIVES today

Wondering about Headlines?

Here’s what I used. It’s another hook. It’s enticing and tells the audience what they’re in for. If they don’t understand what content marketing is, they’ll scan right over it.

If they do, however, they’ll understand the “paint by numbers” reference to making it easy and click the link.

Headline Ex) Paint by numbers for content marketing
Subheadlines are similar to headlines, but they provide more detail and include the excitement your prospective buyer responds to. Here I’ve used a pain point. Content marketing can seem daunting and confusing.

By signing up to get my book they can start “filling in the gaps” and find “an easier way to content market” their businesses.
Subheadline Ex) Start filling in the gaps. Finally an easier way to content market your business.

Some things to consider in any Facebook ad:

Avoid negativity in your ad at all costs.

Facebook is trying to maintain a positive environment. If you’re being too negative they’ll reject your ad, or confine it to the dark spaces of the internet. That includes negative images.

There’s a rumor going around that Facebook rejects all ads with a picture of a gun in it, so ad maker beware.

A note on formatting:

If your ad doesn’t fit, make some cuts.

It’s important to avoid the “read more” link. If a scanning prospect has to click to read more and then click again to sign up or buy – they won’t. Make it easy for your buyer to get where you need them to go. Even if that means deviating from Bryan Cohen’s formula I outlined above – do it.

So that’s the basics. It changed Facebook ads for me exponentially. I know understand the fundamentals to actually making money and gaining followers at the same time instead of emptying my pockets for 1-2 subscribers. Test these tips out for a couple dollars a day and see the difference.

Advanced tip:

Once you start making returns on your Facebook ads, put that money right back into the ad and up the cost per day.

You’ll start seeing those returns grow along with your list. The more money you put in the more you’ll get out. Just follow the formula.
And if you need more direction, don’t hesitate to ask. I do this for my clients all the time. Just email me at Darian@dnccopywriting.com and I’ll respond quickly.

 

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What are some expert tips you have for Facebook Ads? Share in the comments.

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1. How to write Facebook Ads #dnccopywriting #socialmediamarketing

2. “By signing up to get my book they can start “filling in the gaps” and find “an easier way to content market” their businesses” #dnccopywriting #kickstarter

3. Call to Action = Tell them what to do. #dnccopywriting #copywriting

4. “Once you start making returns on your Facebook ads, put that money right back into the ad and up the cost per day” #dnccopywriting #smallbusiness

5. #dnccopywriting #facebookads